Larry Stark's Fishing America
A Conceptual Work of Art


In September 1990, I was driving home to Minnesota from Oregon after a combined fishing and business trip in which no fish had been caught and no business had been done. Covering 1,800 miles in 46 hours, I drove by rivers and lakes, with no time to stop and fish. I began to reflect on the many times I'd passed this way before, always promising myself that I'd return some day just to fish. By Idaho, I was really upset because I knew I'd been fooling myself. I'd never make it back to fish these rivers. It had been just a fantasy.

By the time I got to Montana, I was feeling better. So much better that I resurrected my fantasy--and improved on it by coming up with the idea to some day fish all 50 states. Halfway through North Dakota, I stopped thinking in terms of "some day" and my fantasy began to evolve toward reality as the idea formed in my head to fish all 50 states and write a book about it.

I'm an artist--a printmaker and photographer--and I decided that this project would be a work of art and a book. The book would have lots of photographs, which I'd take myself while traveling from state to state. Maybe a series of prints would come out of it. Maybe a call to the "Guinness Book of World Records" would be in order. No question, this was a big-time idea, and I'd support the project by selling my art to museums and galleries along the way, between fishing experiences.

As soon as I got home, I called my artist-fisherman friend, James Holmes, in Kansas and told him the plan. He said he liked it, then asked, "You'll need help, won't you?"

"Holmes, we've had so many fishing trips planned that didn't materialize, I wouldn't plan another with you unless you signed a contract."

"So send one down. I'll sign it."

I called my attorney the next day and asked him to design a contract. When I picked it up, he said, "I want to sign the first one." That's when I realized that I could fish with a different person in each state and that everyone would sign a contract to fish with me.

I spent time in the library reading about fish and places to fish. I spent more time writing letters and balancing data to figure out what to fish for and where and when to do it. I spent hours on the phone--and a ton of money on my ATT bill--trying to locate fishing partners. Generally, my fishing partners were people who had the knowledge to fish for a targeted species. Some were chosen because they're interesting, others because they're my friends.

In selecting the targeted species, I took into consideration the state fish, the person available to fish with me, his or her particular fish interest and what fish were waiting to be caught.

Here's an example of the fish-finding process:

On November 2, 1990, I was sitting in front of Cyclops, my computer, trying to decide how carp fit into the picture. The field had been narrowed to three states: Massachusetts, Missouri and Illinois. The phone rang, and I answered, "Fishing America--A Work of Art."

"Is Larry Carp there?"

"You mean Larry Stark?"

"No, I mean Larry Carp."

"You have the wrong number, but before you hang up, tell me, where would you fish for carp, in Massachusetts, Missouri or Illinois?"

I would have had a quick solution to my problem if only she had answered my question before hanging up.

I had to solve the problem some other way, so I called a friend in Massachusetts, who suggested we fish for striped bass there. I called a friend-of-a-brother-in-law-of-a-friend in Missouri, and he said he'd rather fish for smallmouth bass in Missouri. He suggested a guy who fishes for carp in Illinois, and that's how my problem got solved.

It might seem like an easy task to fish all 50 states. One scenario that was suggested to me was to leave Minnesota and fish every state going east to Maine, then work my way down to Florida and across to the West Coast. After flying from Los Angeles to Hawaii and back, I'd drive up the coast to Washington, fly round trip from Seattle to Alaska and then fish my way back to Minnesota. This would cover all 35 perimeter states, and after a rest of a day or two, a smaller loop would get the last 15 states.

Another method would be the same trip with more zigs and zags to get everything in one trip. Still another possibility would be to fish the western states on one trip and the eastern states on another.

It doesn't work that way. All fish species are unique, with individual traits and habits. Some fish are easier to catch in the fall, some make better pickings in the spring and there are winter and summer fish, too. As an example, let's take New England. In Vermont, landlocked salmon are best fished during the ice-out in late April or early May. In New Hampshire, pickerel are fun to catch through the ice and the best time to ice fish is when there's ice. The blueback charr, a fish found only in Maine, has to be fished in late September because even though October is best, the season closes October 1. In Massachusetts, striped bass are best fished in early June, when they're running the rivers. So there you have it--four trips to New England to fish four states.

It's generally true that the best fishing is in the spring and fall, and that's when I've done the most fishing.

A question I've heard a lot over the last few years is, "Is this fishing project art?" I think it is, and my argument to support this view is that art is defined by the artists who create it. Given a conventional definition of art, the people who work within this closed set are more artisans than artists. Those who work outside this set are the best artists.

My attorney thinks it's a neat idea, but not art. He thinks art isn't defined by artists but by a combination of society and history. He says that if society doesn't accept an idea as a work of art over a period of time, then it isn't art.

I say I've done it, called it art and will be dead long before the final verdict is in. If nothing else, I've kept society and history and myself from getting bored.


STATE----FISH SPECIES

ALABAMA----ANY SPECIES I'VE NOT CAUGHT ELSEWHERE
ALASKA----KING SALMON AND HALIBUT
ARIZONA----APACHE TROUT
ARKANSAS----BOWFIN
CALIFORNIA----TRIPLE HEADER-ALL THREE-RAINBOW,BROOK AND BROWN
COLORADO----BROOK TROUT
CONNECTICUT----ANY KIND OF TROUT
DELAWARE----WHITE PERCH
FLORIDA----BUTTERFLY PEACOCK BASS
FLORIDA----OSCAR
FLORIDA----SPECK (CRAPPIE)
FLORIDA----GROUPER
GEORGIA----SHOAL BASS AND AN UNNAMED VARIANTS OF SHOAL BASS
HAWAII----ANY KIND OF FISH I'VE NOT CAUGHT BEFORE (CAUGHT 7 DIFFERENT SPECIES)
ILLINOIS----CARP
INDIANA----RED EAR
IDAHO----STEELHEAD
IOWA----BULLHEAD
IOWA----BLUEGILL
KANSAS----FRESH WATER DRUM
KENTUCKY----KENTUCKY BASS
LOUISIANA----ALIGATOR GAR OR LONGEAR SUNFISH
MAINE----BLUEBACK CHAR
MARYLAND-CHANNEL CATFISH
MASSACHUSETTS----STRIPERS OR AMERICAN SHAD
MICHIGAN----YELLOW BELLY PERCH
MINNESOTA----LAKE TROUT
MISSISSIPPI--KING MACKEREL OR COBIA
MISSOURI----SMALLMOUTH BASS
MONTANA----GRAYLING
NEBRASKA----SHOVELNOSE STURGEON OR GOLDEYE
NEVADA----LAHONTAN CUTTHROAT
NEW HAMPSHIRE----PICKEREL
NEW JERSEY---WEAKFISH
NEW MEXICO---RIO GRANDE CUTTHROAT
NEW YORK----EEL
NORTH CAROLINA---LARGEMOUTH BASS
NORTH CAROLINA---PUPPY DRUM
NORTH DAKOTA----NORTHERN PIKE
OHIO----WALLEYE
OKLAHOMA----WHITE BASS (SAND BASS)
OREGON----SQUAWFISH
PENNSYLVANIA----BROWN TROUT
RHODE ISLAND----BLUEFISH
SOUTH CAROLINA----REDBREAST
SOUTH DAKOTA----SAUGER OR SAUGEYE
TENNESSEE----SNAIL DARTER
TEXAS--GUADALUPE BASS
UTAH-BEAR LAKE CISCO and BONNEVILLE WHITEFISH
VERMONT----LANDLOCKED ATLANTIC SALMON
VIRGINIA----ROANOKE BASS
VIRGINIA----CROAKER
VIRGINIA----STRIPED BASS
WASHINGTON----WHITE STURGEON OR DUNGENESS CRABS
WEST VIRGINIA----RAINBOW TROUT
WISCONSIN----MUSKELLUNGE (MUSKIE)
WYOMING----EAST SLOPE CUTTHROAT TROUT

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